from month 11/2008

“Times Higher Ed”, stop muddying the waters

I don’t want to turn myself into a blogger obsessed with sloppy scientific coverage in the media, but I feel someone ought to note, if only for the record, the absurd and misleading comments by Hannah Fearn in the British Times Higher Education Supplement – the trade journal of UK ...

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“Religion, anthropology, and cognitive science” at the 107th AAA meeting

Emma Cohen and Nicola Knight report: At the 107th meeting of the American Anthropological Association held last week in San Francisco, we chaired a panel titled ‘Religion, Anthropology, and Cognitive Science', co-sponsored by the Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness and the ...

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Claude Lévi-Strauss: the first 100 years

Claude Lévi-Strauss - who is 100 years old today! - may well be the most famous anthropologist in the history of the discipline (or is it Margaret Mead?). Among French intellectuals, he cut a singular and imposing figure, second to none and close to none. By making their hearts beat faster ...

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Epidemiology of flu, epidemiology of names

Each week, millions of Google users around the world search for health information online. As you might expect, there are more flu-related searches during flu season, more allergy-related searches during allergy season, and more sunburn-related searches during the summer. Google labs compared ...

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Journalistic teleology

(editor's note) This is Noga Arikha's first post here. She will be blogging regularly on cognitionandculture.net. A philosopher and science historian, Noga published Passions and tempers: a history of the humours, a New York Times Book Review editor's choice, in 2007 (go check her ...

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