from month 02/2009

Cross-cultural differences in risk taking

The study of our way of dealing with risky situations (situations that involve potential losses) is one of the cornerstones of the judgment and decision making literature. It is generally taken for granted that the psychological mechanisms underlying our reactions towards risk are universal. As a ...

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10th Anniversary Inter-University Graduate Conference: Culture, Cognition and Construction

The LSE is proud to announce the hosting of the 10th Anniversary Inter-University Graduate Conference: Culture, Cognition and Construction, May 22-23 2009, in collaboration with Cambridge University.The Conference has traditionally supported the integration of diverse viewpoints across the ...

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Paleolithic art: awesome — but not religious

This would seem to be the conclusion from Dale Guthrie’s massive The Nature of Paleolithic Art, perhaps the most comprehensive and rigorous study to date of cave paintings and other Stone Age artefacts. Guthrie’s no-nonsense, scientifically rigorous study shatters our most cherished and ...

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How persistent are intuitive (erroneous) beliefs?

My motivation for posting this blog is simple: I am wondering whether it is possible for humans to ever truly internalize counterintuitive scientific principles like evolutionary theory or Newtonian (let alone Einsteinian) physics.According to developmental psychologists like Elizabeth Spelke ...

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Newborn infants detect the beat in music

In PNAS February 17, 2009 vol. 106 no. 7 2468-2471,"Newborn infants detect the beat in music" by István Winklera, Gábor P. Hádena, Olivia Ladinig, István Sziller and Henkjan Honing AbstractTo shed light on how humans can learn to underst...

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