from month 11/2008

“Times Higher Ed”, stop muddying the waters

I don’t want to turn myself into a blogger obsessed with sloppy scientific coverage in the media, but I feel someone ought to note, if only for the record, the absurd and misleading comments by Hannah Fearn in the British Times Higher Education Supplement – the trade journal of UK ...

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“Religion, anthropology, and cognitive science” at the 107th AAA meeting

Emma Cohen and Nicola Knight report: At the 107th meeting of the American Anthropological Association held last week in San Francisco, we chaired a panel titled ‘Religion, Anthropology, and Cognitive Science', co-sponsored by the Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness and the ...

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Claude Lévi-Strauss: the first 100 years

Claude Lévi-Strauss - who is 100 years old today! - may well be the most famous anthropologist in the history of the discipline (or is it Margaret Mead?). Among French intellectuals, he cut a singular and imposing figure, second to none and close to none. By making their hearts beat faster ...

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Epidemiology of flu, epidemiology of names

Each week, millions of Google users around the world search for health information online. As you might expect, there are more flu-related searches during flu season, more allergy-related searches during allergy season, and more sunburn-related searches during the summer. Google labs compared ...

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Journalistic teleology

(editor's note) This is Noga Arikha's first post here. She will be blogging regularly on cognitionandculture.net. A philosopher and science historian, Noga published Passions and tempers: a history of the humours, a New York Times Book Review editor's choice, in 2007 (go check her ...

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Do we bend it like Beckham?

This post is part of a small series of posts on social learning and cooperation. Jean-Baptiste's reaction to Laurent Lehmann's (and his colleagues') criticism of Boyd and Richerson's models made me brood over the notion of prestige-biased imitation. This notion is central to ...

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(Archive) Senior fellowships at CRÉUM (Montreal)

Archive: the deadline is passed. (pour la version en français voir: http://www.creum.umontreal.ca/spip.php?article484) The University of Montreal's Centre de recherche en éthique (CRÉUM) is proud to announce senior fellowship grants. We are inviting applications of ...

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A new book by Daniel Everett on the Pirahã

A new book on the Pirahã by Daniel L. Everett: Don't Sleep, There Are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle . (Pantheon Books in the US and Profile books in the UK, November 2008) "An account of the experiences and discoveries made by linguist Daniel Everett while he ...

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This week: social learning and cooperation

This week on cognitionandculture.net, several posts will dwell on social learning and cooperation. Laurent Lehmann, Marcus Feldmann and others have a series of papers that call into question many assumptions frequently made about cultural transmission and the part it played in the emergence of ...

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Is culture what makes us cooperate?

This post by evolutionary biologist Jean-Baptiste André is part of a small series of posts on social learning and cooperation. A recent series of papers by Laurent Lehmann and colleagues (including Marcus Feldman) shed new lights on the cultural evolution of social behaviors, at least on ...

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Fame!

(editor's note) Why are we interested in famous people? Evolutionary psychologists have suggested that social  information served as gossip is inherently interesting for us - information about alliances, personal hatreds, couple formation and splits, is intrinsically rewarding to our brain ...

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Maurice Bloch on BBC Radio 3

Emma Cohen called my attention to a 15 minutes radio essay by Maurice Bloch on BBC Radio 3 (here). Given the time he had, it is one of the best cases I ever heard made for a more a theoretical anthropology - pithy, enthralling, and Maurice has quite a radio voice. I only wish the producers included ...

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